Boutique hotel

Boutique hotel

Brooklyn Hotel

Project details

Sector Hotels

Client Commercial Development Projects

Location Manchester

Value £20 million

Photography by: Daniel Hopkinson

Summary

Brooklyn Hotel is a 190-bedroom, 10 storey, boutique Hotel with a casino of approximately 1500m2 in the basement.

The hotel is constructed from steel from the basement to the second floor. Above second floor advantage is taken of the modular nature of the bedrooms and the construction method changes to pre-cast concrete flat pack. The steel frame is supported on piled foundations, due to the depth of made ground and soft natural ground on the site.

The roof is designed in steel, changing from precast concrete, to provide a clear span from side to side, and to minimise weight. This provides the column free space needed for the penthouse conference and banqueting room.

The Brooklyn Hotel is award-winning rated in the top 20 hottest hotels in The Travellers Choice Best of the Best Awards.

A little more detail

Brooklyn Hotel is a 190-bedroom, 10 storey, boutique Hotel with a casino of approximately 1500m2 in the basement. The site faces Portland Street and is bounded to the south by Major Street and Abingdon Street to the west. To the east is the 55 Portland Street building. Historical mapping shows that the site has remained vacant since before 1948, when it is thought to have been razed during an air raid. The ongoing vacancy was possibly due to the historic silver street sewer crossing under the site, and United Utilities’ reluctance to permit building over. We were able to divert the sewer by sinking a shaft in Sackville Street, freeing this site for development.

The Brooklyn Hotel is constructed from steel from the basement to the second floor. Above second floor advantage is taken of the modular nature of the bedrooms and the construction method changes to pre-cast concrete flat pack. The steel frame is supported on piled foundations, due to the depth of made ground and soft natural ground on the site. The site is adjacent to 55 Portland Street, which was built as Telecom House in 1959, at around the same time as the secret Guardian Exchange beneath Chinatown. The Guardian Exchange was built as part of the nuclear war defences. There is a tunnel from the exchange southwards beneath 55 Portland Street. This is now operated by Open Reach, and we had to demonstrate to them that the foundations will not excessively surcharge to tunnel. The design of the secant pile retaining wall had to be agreed with Manchester City Council, as it supports the roads on three sides of the building. The piled wall also supports vertical super structure loads, which are particularly heavy on the Portland Street elevation where 8 stories of bedrooms occupy air rights on a cantilever above Portland Street pavement. The cantilever is supported on 4 plate girders. These are carefully designed to optimise weight versus stiffness. The weight limit of 11 tons each was governed by the lifting capacity of the tower crane. Booth King liaised closely with SRC (engineers for the specialist precast contractor) to ensure that deflections were controlled and managed at levels that could be accommodated by the precast structure.

Further transfer structures are included at first floor to collect pairs of columns on the line of the corridor into a single column to maximise clear floor space in the reception area and the casino. Transfer structures are designed as key elements against disproportionate collapse. Vertical ties are provided between the steel frame and the precast load bearing walls by grouting starter bars into the walls. The starter bars are fixed to the steelwork by way of welded-on Ancon reinforcement connectors. In order to minimise the excavation in the basement, to provide the casino operator’s stipulated floor to ceiling heights, and not impinging on the drainage falls, a Slim-floor construction is adopted for the ground floor.

The project used around 350T of steel for the frame from basement to second floor. This provides 4000m2 of floor area, equating to 85kg/m2 excluding connections and fittings. We minimised the steel tonnage by designing the second floor structure so that the first lift of precast concrete walls could be the transfer structure spanning between the columns below. We added further efficiencies by spanning the bedroom floor slabs across two bedrooms, so that only alternate walls are loadbearing, and by this, halving the number of transfer beams that would have been required.

The roof is designed in steel, changing from precast concrete, to provide a clear span from side to side, and to minimise weight. This provides the column free space needed for the penthouse conference and banqueting room.
The Brooklyn Hotel is award winning rated in the top 20 hottest hotels in The Travellers Choice Best of the Best Awards.

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